Bibliography (sort of)
A more than less random list of books that are somehow related to The God Patent & The Sensory Deception
Books that appear in The God Patent QED by Richard Feynman The Feynman Lectures on Physics by Feynman, Leyton and Sands, all three volumes – especially Chapter 1 of volume III Wrinkles in Time by George Smoot The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg Fuzzy Thinking by Bart Kosko   Ransom’s favorite Popular Science books Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman by Ralph Leighton The God Particle by Leon Lederman The Quantum Frontier: The Large Hadron Collider by Don Lincoln The Quark and the Jaguar by Murray Gell-Man Relativity by Albert Einstein Concepts of Particle Physics by Gottfried and Weisskopf Ransom’s favorite books Fiction PS Your Cat is Dead by James Kirkwood "I read this book about a gay stoner with bad luck when I was 12. It influenced me in every possible way: I couldn’t wait to smoke pot, discovered how to enjoy being depressed, and learned the absurdity of homophobia; each an important lesson for the All American Boy.” The Harp and the Blade by John Myers Myers “Long out of print, bawdy, packed with morale injustice and drinking songs, this fantasy of a cursed minstrel is the exception to the rule that a great story requires lots of tension and high stakes.” Call of the Wild by Jack London "I too raised my muzzle and howled." The Hollow Hills (etc) by Mary Stewart “My favorite version of my favorite story; every really great tragedy is Arthurian.” East of Eden by John Steinbeck “One day I walked into a bookstore and saw The God Patent a little to the right of East of Eden. I proceeded directly to a bar, bought a shot of scotch and toasted myself.” The Black Company by Glen Cook “This fantasy saga breaks the good-evil rules, installs thick rich characters and turns the whole concept of battlefield magic into something that works.” The Art of Racing in the Rain, by Garth Stein “The view of the foibles of a troubled man from the point of view of his dog.” Exult by Joe Quirk “Half tragedy half philosophy text and perhaps the most well kept secret in literary fiction.” Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson “I put off reading Cryptonomicon despite friends’ suggestions for years and then picked it up when a guy at the bookstore said, “… this sort of reminds me of The God Patent,” I love that man.” The Afghan by Frederick Forsyth “Perhaps the best thriller I’ve read. Forsyth, by the way, puts on a plotting clinic in every book he writes.” The Panther’s Hoard by Nancy Varian Berberick “Includes one of my all time favorite characters, Lydi, as compassionate and gentle as can be.” All her Father’s Guns by James Warner “Also from Numina Press. James is one of these talents that’s going to explode on the scene and people will say he’s an overnight sensation. After decades of hard work.”   Nonfiction Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat “A great story that should be read by everyone who loves dogs.” Mathematical Physics by Eugene Butkov “I got his beautiful red and gold bound textbook when I was a senior in high school purely for the title and binding and since then have opened it at every opportunity. It turned out to be pretty good, too.” The Immense Journey by Loren Eisely Mind in the Waters by Joan McIntyre “Covers dolphins and whales in myth, legend, culture, zoology and biology; I carried it with me everywhere from age 10 to 18.” A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers “Stranded at the Denver airport overnight, I bought this book, read it and saw the life I shared with my daughter in those pages. Had I not read this book, it’s possible I’d have never written one. I therefore blame Dave Eggers for everything.” Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby (plus every other book he’s written) “This is what it’s like to be a fan in the truest sense of the word; Nick breathes Arsenal Red, I sweat silver and black.” What Do You Care what Other People Think? by Richard Feynman Churchill by Martin Gilbert “Unashamed, uber-patriotic story of the man who won WWII, it’ll bring out the Anglophile in you.” Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention by Elizabeth Drinker Bowen “Amazingly digestible play-by-play action of how the US government was formulated; if only we paid closer attention to our ideals.” Books for writers: On the Craft The Synonym Finder by J.I. Rodale “It’s kind of embarrassing, but I couldn’t write a page without this book on the table next to me.” The Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White “Short and simple basics worthy of frequent review, but I didn’t need to tell you that, did I?” Fowler’s Modern English Usage “If the Oxford English Dictionary defines the language, Fowler defines how it should be used. This book is the authority, defy it at your own risk; plus, Fowler is so pompous that his demands are hilarious.” Self-Editing for Fiction Writers: How to Edit Yourself into Print by Renni Browne and Dave King “Far more than a book on editing, I think this is the ultimate book on craft at the sentence-paragraph level.” Characters and Viewpoint by Orson Scott Card Writing Novels that Sell by Jack M. Bickham “In addition to being an awesome training course for developing and writing smooth, professional stories, this book cracks me up because Bickham is so cranky.” Writing the Blockbuster Novel by Albert Zuckerman "Big league agent simplifies the elements of the blockbuster guided by specific examples; really teaches you the craft at the book level.” Writing the Breakout Novel by Donald Maass “Read this one after Zuckerman’s because Maass works through the finer points.” The Art of Fiction by David Lodge "Relaxing stroll through the craft of the critic.” How to Write a Book Proposal by Michael Larsen “Necessary evil.” Motivation On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King “There are a lot of great craft suggestions too, but mostly I find this book more of a survival guide than a writing text.” Zen in the Art of Writing by Ray Bradbury On Writing by F. Scott Fitzgerald “Letters too and from writers and editors of his time.” The Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell “Has nothing to do with writing other than what Dennis Lehane calls the writer’s greatest challenge: fear management.” Your Pursuit of Greatness - a workbook by Ransom Stephens “This is the workbook that accompanies my career transition speech. It helps people are really going for it to see their way up the metaphorical hill.”
(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; var fb_host = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https:" : "http:"); if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;} js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ""+ fb_host + "//connect.facebook.net/en_GB/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));
Ransom Stephens scientist, author, speaker
Sign up for Ransom’s Notes!
Buy
Buy
Buy